Tuesday, 5 February 2013

How to Make a Men's Tie... Properly

My husband recently bought some new business shirts but was unable to find a tie that matched their colours. I spent a long time searching the Internet for clear instructions and information on the proper construction of men's ties but was able to find very little (there is plenty of info on how to make a simple version of a tie, but not much on the couture techniques). In desperation, I finally unpicked an unwanted tie to discover the secret of its lovely corners and wonderful shape holding properties. From this information, combined with a free Internet pattern, I was able to come up with a tie that is constructed just like those in menswear shops.

Materials
- 1 metre fabric (as ties are cut on the bias)
- fusible interfacing
- light wadding/heavy interfacing (for shape holding part of tie)
- iron & ironing board
- sewing machine
- tie pattern (click on the link)
- lots of patience!!

Instructions

1. Cut out the fusible interfacing and lay it out on the fabric (on the bias). Iron the fusible interfacing to fabric and then cut around it to cut out the fabric. This stabilises the slippery satin fabric (or whatever fabric you choose). Cut out the lining pieces for the tie ends and the tie holder (long rectangle of fabric).

2. Place the lining over the bottom of the tie, right sides together. As you can see in the pictures below, place the lining 2 cm off centre. The sides of the point should match up, but the lining is pulled back down the tie fabric by 2 cm. Stitch one side first. Then carefully pin the other side in the same manner. You will have a small peak in the tie fabric, but the lining fabric will it flat. See second picture.

Match the lining and tie fabric 2 cm off.
Lining stitched to tie leaving a peak in the tie fabric.

3. Fold tie in half with lining on the inside and tie fabric on the outside. Sew across the tie, at right angles with the folded edge of the tie. The fold for this stitching line can be seen where my first finger is pointing on the picture below.

Tie folded for stitching across the pointed corner.

4. Turn the tie right side out and press the point corner carefully, making sure that the lining layer sits inside the tie fabric layer at the bottom. You can see this best in the brown tie. See picture below.
Lovely point created with this method of sewing ties. (Hidden lining)
The point of my green tie.
Both ends complete

5. Do the same with the lining of the small end of the tie.
6. Join the tie sections together to form one long tie piece. Make sure the you stitch them the correct way so the your edges match nicely. Press the seams open and flat.

Joined tie.

7. Lay the tie out flat and lay the wadding or stiff interfacing inside the centre of the tie. Carefully iron the sides over the wadding/interfacing to farm the shape of the tie. Make sure that you press this very well so that the tie will hold its shape properly. Iron down one seam allowance on the right side of the tie so that when the sides are both closed up, the neatened edge sit on top. Make sure that the interfacing is covered all the way own the tie.

Lay the insert inside the tie.

Iron the edges over and the seam allowance on the right side.

8. Pin the tie carefully down the centre back, closing the tie up. Make sure that the seam is centred and even. Make the tie holder and pin it in the seam at the back. Using hidden stitches, close the seam at the back, going through the interfacing layer to catch it in place inside the tie, but avoiding coming through to the front.

Tie pinned, ready to stitch  up the back.

Pin the tie holder in place.

9. Open the tie holder out and stitch the sides down so that it will hold the tail of tie securely when worn. Press the tie once again and enjoy the finished product!

Open the tie holder out and stitch flat.

My completed green satin tie.

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